We've made it clear that to improve your t'ai chi you must understand the t'ai chi principles and practice regularly and with awareness. Now let's look at some other methods that will help you improve your skills...

Read more ...

The origin of Taijiquan is one mixed with legends, theories, and folklore. The most commonly held belief places its historical origin around a small village in China's Henan Province (Chenjiagou), in the late Ming and early Qing dynasties.

Read more ...

Tai Chi teaches us how to walk. Every step is slow and exaggerated, so we have a chance to notice and shape every detail of the process. My students and I practice what I call feather walking to prepare us physically and mentally to do the Tai Chi sequence

Read more ...

Many people are drawn to study Taiji for its refined martial arts techniques demonstrated with such principles as moving 10,000 pounds with a single ounce. The martial art of Taiji cannot be applied with muscle strength alone, but requires some understanding of Qi movement in one's own body and how it interacts with an opponent.

Read more ...

A wise company knows that its success is dependent upon its most valuable resource: its employees. The number of wellness programs springing up throughout our country's corporations today is a testimony to this fundamental truth.

Read more ...

Those of us with a regular Tai Chi practice intrinsically understand its value for everything from physical fitness to spiritual fulfillment. In communicating our enthusiasm for Tai Chi, what we often lack is the kind of hard evidence for Tai Chi's value that can break through the wall of skepticism put up by many westerners.

Read more ...

Prior to producing momentum, the body gesture should be stable and the balance completely centered. The mind and body should be relaxed. There should be no hesitation, no rigidity. Remove all distracting thoughts from the mind and allow the return of the body gesture to that state of being natural...

Read more ...

The ancient Chinese martial art of Tai Chi Chuan (Taijiquan) is the perfect calisthenic for today's seniors. The relaxed and unhurried movements help alleviate nervous and muscular tension. Tai Chi Chuan lubricates joints and promotes automatic body alignment for better control of balance, helping to prevent the instability that can lead to falls.

Read more ...

As we progress in our taiji from simple movements, short form, long form, applications, to free style, there is still one phase of taiji (tai chi) that is rarely spoken about or taught. The process of learning to take punches, hits, blows, or pushes is very important to help us deepen our practice and ground us in our taiji...

Read more ...

Knee injuries are regrettably common among martial artists and people in general. They’re stubborn and slow to heal. Using massage and self-applied acupressure, this exercise nourishes the knee with blood and qi. It can speed the repair process and, better yet, prevent injuries from occurring.

Read more ...

A philosophy subsumes principles. In taijiquan there are abundant principles to fill many inch-thick books published. All these principles tie-in with the philosophy of taiji. Taiji is the draw-string of a net of principles. To talk about principles without touching on philosophy makes for diverse beliefs and different schools...

Read more ...

One of the most important factors to consider when performing Taijiquan, is body posture. Here, we present a computer animation of a human skeleton performing the opening movements of a typical Yang style Taijiquan form. This skeleton shows the structural posture needed to perform these movements correctly.

Read more ...

Three attributes measure your effectiveness as a tai chi (taiji) teacher: your attitude, your tai chi skills and your teaching skills. In Chapter 5 of my book Teaching Tai Chi Effectively, I describe The Stepwise Progressive Teaching Method, these will be incorporated into one easy-to-learn system.

Read more ...

Standing an egg-on-end requires an approach similar to what we learn in both T'ai Chi (Taiji) and Ch'i Kung (Qigong) Standing Meditation. Setting your feet, or in this case the end of the egg, down on a surface in a relaxed and supportive way will help insure that eventually it will stand upright and balanced.

Read more ...

Being a student and teacher of Taiji I have found that there are three key rhythms to Taiji. First, is the normal way of doing Taiji, not to fast not too slow, a steady natural flow of movements leading one form into another like a dance...

Read more ...

Taijiquan has become the most popular exercise in China at the turn of the century. However, during the Culture Revolution in the 1960s, Taijiquan along with many other traditionally valued activities was considered bourgeois. It therefore underwent a hiatus during that period of time in China. Fortunately, like good art and wine...

Read more ...

It cannot be ignored that the authentic taijiquan (t'ai chi ch'uan) which existed not too many decades ago did not have access to boom boxes much less iTunes. What is irrefutable however is that, at what was arguably the starting point of modern taiji sport, Yang Cheng Fu clearly advised its performance as "like a great river rolling to the sea"...

Read more ...