What's in the Autumn 2021 Issue?

Wuji-The Fist; Wuji-The Dao

Wuji-The Fist; Wuji-The Dao

This past year of 2020 was marked by chaos and restrictions. In the deep meditative practice of Wuji Quan, when I embraced each moment that the Dao intends for us, my heart went to the millions of people who got swept up in the emotions of fear, panic, anger, and anxiety, and as a result were left feeling heartbroken, helpless and powerless. I wished they could have the tools and practices that would support them to bring their troubled hearts back into the flow of life. Practicing Wuji Quan and cultivating the inner state of abiding in Wuji, we gain deep trust in the universe, knowing that it will always have our back and is forever on our side. By Helen Liang


What is Qi?

What is Qi?

Qi is an energy concept born of an age-old non-science era, under the auspices of the Taiji Theory of Yin-Yang, but not of an alternate universe. The challenge has been to explicate Qi without being entangled in the esoterica of its ancient wrappings. Qi is pervasive in the Chinese culture, from fengshui, geomancy, and cosmogony to food, health, and medicine. Colloquially, Qi means “air, breath, or vapor,” but in technical use, it takes on the meaning of a “refined substance” or energy, distilled in the essence of a life-force or vital energy that animates all things. By C.P. ONG. Ph.D.


Yangsheng and the Way We Live Now

Yangsheng and the Way We Live Now

Taking care of yourself and knowing how to do it has been a part of Chinese culture for thousands of years. As a way of life, Yangsheng is something broader than Chinese Medicine, although Chinese Medicine contributes to it, as do Buddhism, Taoism (Daoism), Confucianism and the traditional ways and rhythms of an ancient people(s) who studied nature in its seasonal transformations and drew lessons for themselves. Practiced by all ages for many ages, Yangsheng is both a set of principles for healthy living and a guide to the good life. It's a set of practices and a world view—a world view more holistic than ours and one that hasn’t been shaped by nor is dependent on consumer culture. For centuries, it was just how one lived. By Rebecca Pope

 


The Body is the Temple for the Spirit

The body is the temple for the spirit

The quality and condition of our life is heavily affected by the quality and condition of our body and vice versa: the condition of our body is heavily affected by our experience of life. Both hereditary and environmental factors affect us: our genetic structure, and where and how we live, can activate the pre-dispositions of the body. Daoist tradition has held that through the practice of Qigong and Tai Chi we can alter both the post-heaven and the pre-heaven conditions of our body. By Corinne Chaves


Departments:

Departments

Departments include “Tai Chi and Sensitivity” by John Murney. It is said that a taiji master can read and interpret an approaching force with a mere touch, but how do we attain such an awareness? Bernard Seif shares “Frankl’s Logotherapy, Zen, and the Quest for Human Identity” where he compares a Holocaust survivor’s story with Zen traditions and how both are paths to the same goal of relief from suffering. And finally Steven Luo shares “I’d Rather Be a Happy Turtle”, a famous Chinese parable about an encounter with the Daoist Zhuang Zi.

I hope you enjoy this, our 123rd issue.