What's in the Summer 2020 Issue?

Understanding the Hips and the Waist

Thoughtful investigation of the practices and writings of the past masters of tàijíquán (太極拳) reveals that success in the art is contingent on correct understanding and employment of the hips and the waist by the taijiquan practitioner. Understanding the hips and the waist is one of most difficult yet most rewarding challenges encountered within taijiquan training. By Sam Masich

An Integrative Medicine Approach:
Optimize Your Immune System with Traditional Chinese Medicine

The World Health Organization finally declared COVID-19 a pandemic on March 11, 2020. The advent of the novel virus, SARS-CoV-2 has shattered old established medical paradigms and mobilized Medical Doctors, hospitals and government authorities to implement Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) as adjunct therapy in effort to help save lives. An unintended consequence of the COVID-19 Pandemic, this historical event is ushering in a new era of Integrative Medicine, perhaps for the greater good. In the first week of February 2020, the Chinese government mandated that Chinese herbs be used as concomitant therapy for all active cases of COVID-19. By Professor L. Francesca Ferrari, L.Ac.


Qi–The Power Source of Taijiquan

In this article we will examine the concept of qi and how it is understood and developed in Taijiquan. To begin to appreciate and practically apply the various methods of storing and circulating qi we need to think within a certain conceptual framework. The first hurdle to overcome is to understand that there is no single word translation into the English language for the character qi. Qi is usually represented as “energy”, “vital energy” or “life force”, but none of these is adequate. By Davidine Siaw-Voon Sim


The Xingqi Techniques of Master Hu Yaozhen

As I was studying Hun Yuan Qigong I became fascinated with one of the Grandfathers of the system, Master Hu Yaozhen. Being an academic at heart I began researching to see what I could find. Master Hu describes his unique form of Qigong in his 1959 book, Qigong. The writing style of the time is rather dense. I have taken the liberty of breaking up the original style into multiple sections in order to highlight Master Hu’s teachings. By Dr. Kevin Siddons, Ed.D.


Departments:

A special news article on 94-year old Taijiquan instructor Doreen Hynd; “Chaos & Buddha” by Shifu Neil Ripski explains how to deal with chaos to make life more livable and even enjoyable; “The Dragon Boat Festival” by Steven Luo explains the customs and origins of the famous festival; “Three Hardy Herbs Anyone Can Grow and Their Medicinal Virtues” by Dr. Darren Holman reviews Rosemary, Sage and Thyme from a Western and Eastern perspective; “How Qigong Changes the Brain” by Donald Felty, Ph.D. explains how qigong practice can change the actual structure and profoundly rewire our brains; and we even have a short poem by Jim Birt to round out this, our 118th issue.